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Old English Dictionary

 

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H . the eighth letter of the English alphabet, is classed among the consonants, and is formed with the mouth organs in the same position as that of the succeeding vowel. It is used with certain consonants to form digraphs representing sounds which are not found in the alphabet, as sh, th, /, as in shall, thing, /ine (for zh see /274); also, to modify the sounds of some other letters, as when placed after c and p, with the former of which it represents a compound sound like that of tsh, as in charm (written also tch as in catch), with the latter, the sound of f, as in phase, phantom. In some words, mostly derived or introduced from foreign languages, h following c and g indicates that those consonants have the hard sound before e, i, and y, as in chemistry, chiromancy, chyle, Ghent, Ghibelline, etc.; in some others, ch has the sound of sh, as in chicane. See Guide to Pronunciation, // 153, 179, 181-3, 237-8.
H . The seventh degree in the diatonic scale, being used by the Germans for B natural. See B.
Ha interj. An exclamation denoting surprise, joy, or grief. Both as uttered and as written, it expresses a great variety of emotions, determined by the tone or the context. When repeated, ha, ha, it is an expression of laughter, satisfaction, or triumph, sometimes of derisive laughter; or sometimes it is equivalent to "Well, it is so."
Ha-ha n. A sunk fence; a fence, wall, or ditch, not visible till one is close upon it.
Haaf n. The deepsea fishing for cod, ling, and tusk, off the Shetland Isles.
Haak n. A sea fish. See Hake.
Haar n. A fog; esp., a fog or mist with a chill wind.
Habeas corpus . A writ having for its object to bring a party before a court or judge; especially, one to inquire into the cause of a person's imprisonment or detention by another, with the view to protect the right to personal liberty; also, one to bring a prisoner into court to testify in a pending trial.
Habendum n. That part of a deed which follows the part called the premises, and determines the extent of the interest or estate granted; -- so called because it begins with the word Habendum.
Haberdash v. i. To deal in small wares.
Haberdasher n. A dealer in small wares, as tapes, pins, needles, and thread; also, a hatter.
Haberdasher n. A dealer in drapery goods of various descriptions, as laces, silks, trimmings, etc.
Haberdashery n. The goods and wares sold by a haberdasher; also (Fig.), trifles.
Haberdine n. A cod salted and dried.
Habergeon n. Properly, a short hauberk, but often used loosely for the hauberk.
 
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Exuviability : n. Capability of shedding the skin periodically.

 
Based on The Online Plain Text English Dictionary (OPTED) produced by Ralph S. Sutherland from the 1913 edition of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
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